Two Ads I Like And One I Don’t – Alyson Ho

The telco race has become more intense than ever. Everyone is offering unlimited data, free upgrades, zero contracts, kitchen sinks and more. All of which enables today’s data-dependent generation to enjoy never-ending scrolling and streaming.

After service provider Circles.Life changed Singapore’s telco game by introducing their unlimited data plan, local incumbents have stepped up their game to offer similar benefits, with new packages and of course, new promotional materials.

With so much noise out there, I thought I’d talk a look at what stands out and what triggers the coveted decision to switch.


 

Two Ads I Like

Hello Change | StarHub

People are sick of the hidden costs, restrictions, and overall inefficiency of telcos – and are not afraid to talk about it. Starhub’s “Hello Change” campaign shows they are not afraid to acknowledge this negativity and are determined to revolutionize the way people perceive and interact with the telco industry.

Bold statements and quirky visuals bring a refreshing, engaging, and optimistic take on the telco landscape.

O2 – Breathe It All In

Looking outside the local scene, we see UK player O2 taking on a different perspective and message. Without explicitly alluding to anything telco or digital-related, the ad creates excitement without being hyper-energetic, instead uplifting and inspiring. It shifts the conversation from being free to being alive and full of wonder at the world around us, bringing a breath of fresh air to the telco space.


 

One I Don’t Like

Upsize your savings with Singtel Circle

Unfortunately, local giant Singtel missed the mark with their recent ‘bundle deal’ advertisement, where a family in a fast-food counter scene enquires about upsizing their plan with ad copy interjected with cringe-worthy dad jokes.

While the intent was to engage through humor, it came through rather weakly.

Ads need to not only engage the viewer but to resonate with them and their values. Offering “more” – having more, doing more – might be one of the ways to attract consumers, but once everyone talks about being “unlimited”, it becomes limiting instead of building a brand’s point of difference.

As communication technology powers ahead towards faster data speeds and wider connectivity, perhaps it’s no longer about portraying technology as something that enables us to do more, but technology as a window from which we experience the world – opening up many more possibilities.

 

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