Korea’s Gmarket Launches ‘Green Toaster’ Device to Sterilize Smartphones

 

Update: Came across a kickstarter campaign started by G Market to raise funds for this project while promising delivery by January 2016. The fundraising drive is set to end August 13th with a goal of about $600,000. Thus far having a tough go of it, having raised only $3.10. (screenshots posted below)


Forget about smartphone radio waves turning your frontal lobe into jello, now you’ve got to worry about bacteria trying to do you in, too. Who knew your smartphone could be so dangerous?


 

So contends eBay Korea-owned Gmarket with the release of the “Green Toaster” smartphone sterilizer.

“Shockingly, there are over 7,000 types of bacteria living on your smartphone,” the online retail company says in a promo for the Green Toaster –a UV ray-equipped device designed to prevent bacterial infestation from ruining your weekend marathon session of Clash of Clans.

Teaming up with design firm Innored Korea and UK-based Kinneir Dufort Design, Gmarket envisions the device being used in public places, such as cafes, by smartphone bacteria-weary consumers.

Branding bacterial fear could not be better timed in South Korea –A country just recovering from a paralyzing outbreak of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome.


 

“We thought about how best to sanitize a smartphones and what device we could use in a cafe environment, which is a very sociable one,” said Craig Wightman, of Kinneir Dufort.

Using the device is simple: Just activate the Green Toaster with an app on your smartphone, drop your phone in, like you would a piece of bread, and wait for the UV light scanner to do its magic.

Smartphone bacteria Sanitizer

The Green Toaster smartphone bacteria sanitizer comes with an app (featuring scary bacteria) to activate the life-saving device.

Will this sell?

This will likely do well in the Korean market, though we don’t know as yet whether it is targeted solely towards public facilities, cafes, restaurants, government offices, etc., or for personal home use as well.

One thing is certain: Branding bacterial fear could not be better timed in South Korea. The ROK is just getting over a paralyzing outbreak of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) that rocked the nation -and people planning on visiting there- for much of the early summer.

View the promo:

Should you really worry about bacteria?

7,000 species of bacteria on your smartphone is not such an outlandish claim –one study claimed to have found 20,000 in a cup of seawater.

According to research carried out by microbiologist James Francis, a test for bacteria revealed 15,000 found on one tablet, four smartphones and five keyboards. That’s more than you find on a toilet seat and flush handle said Francis.

The bacteria found in the study however did not include the real nasties such as e.coli and salmonella.

Smartphone santizer toaster korea

Look, honey, no bacteria. Can I have a sip of your coffee?

Even Blackberry (yes, they are still around) announced plans in June to release a bacteria free phone.

Blackberry is targeting hospital workers based on findings that between 20 and 30 per cent of the bacterial transfer takes place between the screen of the cell phone and the finger of the user –which can then be passed on to the patient.

So, is this really a thing? Are we really in danger or is this the making of a market? And, if it is so serious what’s taking so long for the government release of ubiquitous bacteria free toilet seats and handles?

No, wait, there’s more bacteria on a smartphone than on a toilet. I forgot. First things first.


 

Green Toaster Bacteria Smartphone

Green Toaster Kickstarter Campaign

Green Toaster Bacteria Smartphone

Green Toaster Kickstarter Campaign


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