Consumers Expect Brands to Protect the Environment More Than Government Regulations

Image: Dollar Gill via Unsplash

According to a new study by research organization Mintel, “Consumers around the world believe companies are the most responsible for a whole host of sustainability issues.”

The Mintel Sustainability Barometer, which features research and insight on consumers’ sustainability attitudes, behaviors, and purchase preferences across 16 countries, offers recommendations for brands and lays the majority share of saving the environment on them with the research finding that almost half (48%) of global consumers believe companies are responsible for increasing the amount of packaging that is recycled, while only a quarter (25%) believe responsibility lies with consumers and just a fifth (20%) with governments.

Meanwhile, two in five (41%) global consumers believe that companies are responsible for reducing emissions from air transport, compared to 36% who believe it’s up to governments, and just 12% who think it is the responsibility of consumers.

 
 

“Given that the International Energy Agency (IEA) believes that over half of the cumulative emissions reductions required to reach zero are linked to consumer choices, one might hope consumers accept more responsibility; however, our research shows consumers say companies are most responsible,” said Richard Cope, Senior Trends Consultant, Mintel Consulting.

“There are several possible reasons why consumers put the onus on companies. More effective activism, for example, promotes the belief that companies are to blame—whilst the sheer scale of the problem demands a response that feels beyond the capabilities of mere consumers.”

Despite this, over half of the consumers surveyed (54%) also believe we still have time to save the planet and 51% think their own behavior can make a positive difference to the environment. This is especially the case for Canadian (65%), Italian (64%), German and Spanish consumers (59% respectively), and 56% of British consumers.

“It’s good to see that consumers don’t completely absolve themselves,” Cope added. “In fact, in most countries, a small majority still believe there is enough time for redemption, and where there is this optimism it’s closely linked to a sense that consumer behavior can make a difference.”

 
 

Cope went on to add:

“Educating consumers about sustainability should help increase their engagement, as there seems to be a sustainability gap—a striking difference between consumers’ experience with the causes of climate change and the reality of where the responsibilities lie. One of the major challenges for companies and brands is how to effectively close this understanding gap to better position their products and services as part of the sustainability solution.”

“More companies need to take the lead in asserting their positive credentials, but also in explaining what they view as the real societal problems—as well as their main business challenges. Messaging and campaigns will be most impactful if brands coordinate with government efforts or embrace the zeitgeist for environmental awakening documentaries like Seaspiracy and Kiss the Ground.”

Consumers want to know the direct environmental impact of their purchases

Finally, the report said, that when asked what encourages them to buy products or services which claim to benefit/protect the environment, “consumers are most likely to want information on how their purchase has a direct impact, such as one tree planted per purchase (48%). They are also looking for labeling to show the environmental impact, such as CO2 emitted (47%).”

You can download the Mintel report here.

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